Beta Alanine and Citrulline Malate for Lean Muscle Gains

Even the most dedicated gym member will face the dreaded plateau. Whether you are stuck at a certain weight for your lifts or struggle to finish your reps, it is frustrating to not see forward progression. 

Sometimes, your muscles burn out and refuse to cooperate, other times you are simply too sore from previous workouts. So how do you improve? The solution is very simple: a synergistic combination of the preworkout supplements beta alanine and citrulline malate. 

What are Beta Alanine and Citrulline Malate?

Quick Benefits

These two supplements are incredibly popular, and for good reason--they actually work. Take your favorite preworkout blend off the shelf, and I guarantee you it has at least one if not both of these supplements. 

Beta alanine's primary benefit is an increase in power output. Once ingested, beta alanine converts to carnosine. This helps buffer lactic acid build up in your muscles, which leads to a direct increase in physical performance, repetitions, and lean muscle growth [1, 2, 3].

Citrulline malate also helps buffer acid as well as ammonia [4]. The main benefit of citrulline malate, however, is it's ability to reduce muscle soreness by 40% [5, 6]. Citrulline malate also helps to reduce fatigue from prolonged workouts [7, 8, 9]

Thus, you will be able to work harder for longer, while simultaneously reducing muscle soreness and building lean muscle.

Beta Alanine and Citrulline Malate Dosage

When dosing your preworkout supplements, you can stick with the general suggestion or calculate your dosage based on your body weight. Calculating your dosage will result in the most accurate dose for you. 

Many individuals choose to start with 2g of beta alanine. If you want to calculate your body weight dosage, beta alanine should be dosed at 16mg/kg [10]. This translates to a little more than 1g for a 150lb person and approximately 1.5g for a 200lb person.

Citrulline malate calls for a larger dosage. Individuals can start with 3g-6g or calculate their dosage at 40mg/kg [11]. This translates to roughly 2.75g for a 150lb person and a little more than 3.5g for a 200lb person. 

Measuring Your Supplement Powder

The GM-20 digital milligram scale is accurate to 0.001g (1mg)

The most accurate way to measure your supplements is with a digital milligram scale. They are easy to use, compact, and ensure much more accurate dosing. For supplements that call for larger doses such as beta alanine and citrulline malate, you will need a scale accurate to at least .01g (10mg). 

However, if you also use supplement powder that call for very small dosages, then you will want a scale accurate to .001g (1mg). 

Sources

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20671038
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22463603
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20386120
  4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1554874
  5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1554874
  6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20386132
  7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12145119
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20386132
  9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16679980
  10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10951107
  11. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21664351

About Samantha Bookwalter

Google+

Samantha Bookwalter is freelance writer and social media specialist. She specializes in web editing, copy editing, copy writing, social media management, HTML, CSS, and other web-related acronyms. Samantha has an affinity for health and fitness; in her free time she enjoys working out with her husband and researching recipes that are not only healthy but delicious too.

Disclaimer

Statements found within have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These dietary supplement products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always consult a physician if you are unsure about taking a new supplement. Do not take this supplement if you are under 18, if you are pregnant, nursing, or have any cardiovascular issues.

Scientific studies cited are not conclusive and have limitations, due to of their closed environment nature. Referenced studies will not necessarily determine your experience with a supplement, since there are many unaccounted variables, which fall outside the scope of the studies.

The reviews contained within are the opinions of contributors and are not necessarily the views or opinions of Powder City. These reviews should not be taken as fact or recommendation, and are only opinions of products that the contributors may have or may have not used. Powder City makes no warranty, implied or expressed, to the accuracy of information provided by these reviews.